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Jewish values

Appreciation

Expressing appreciation to others and to God helps us feel greater empathy and cultivates positive feelings and healthy relationships.

Avoiding Waste

We are tenants on God’s earth with responsibilities to and for the environment, and partners with God in the creation of the world and in its maintenance.

Celebrate Jerusalem

Jerusalem - the capital of the Jewish nation and our spiritual pole - permeates our tefillot, beliefs, thoughts, and practices.

Chain of Tradition

Our beliefs and practices link us in a chain of tradition with previous generations, while our creativity adds new links to that chain.

Cherishing the Elderly

We must recognize the "beauty" of older people's past and current contributions to their community and family. The elderly deserve to be treated with respect, understanding, and special sensitivity.

Community

Membership in our diverse Jewish community is a precious thing. We belong simultaneously to several communities and have responsibilities to each. The community also has responsibility to each individual member.

Courage

It takes courage to stand up for one’s beliefs and convictions, to stand up to authority when necessary, to be different, and to resist negative peer pressure.

Dignity

Each person possesses infinite value and is entitled to infinite respect and concern.

Family Harmony

Positive family relations must be purposely built, and each individual must contribute to that effort.

Festivals of Joy

The Jewish holidays during the month of Tishrei give us the opportunity to enhance our spiritual happiness.

Finding Beauty

There is beauty created by God, beauty created by people, beauty found inside of us, and beauty we perceive in others.

Freedom

The Jewish idea of freedom is linked to responsibility and a higher purpose in life.

Friendship

True and enduring friendship can only be built on a foundation of giving.

Guarding Your Health

We are created in the image of God; therefore, our bodies should be treated with care and respect.

Happiness

Simhah is ideally a state of internal happiness that derives from satisfaction, trust, faith, confidence, hopefulness, and appreciation of the “little things in life.”

Heroism

Jewish tradition demands that we stand up to authority when the pursuit of justice requires it.

Holiness

When we imitate God, we translate holiness into action. Holiness is a separation, not a detachment. Holiness is conveyed through time, place, status, and nationhood.

Hope

Jewish values, prayers, and role models empower us to feel hopeful about the future.

Hospitality

We perform this mitzvah by welcoming guests to our homes, synagogues, schools, and neighborhoods. Even nations have an obligation to welcome strangers.

Humility

Humble people have an honest perception of themselves but don’t deny their talents. Instead, they recognize that their abilities are gifts from God.

In God's Image

When we recognize that all people are created in God’s image, we connect to that part of God in them and treat them with love and respect.

Ingathering of Exiles to Israel

The longing of Jews to return to Israel has helped us retain a Jewish identity throughout the centuries. The aliyah of Jews from all over the world has transformed Israel.

Judge Favorably

We must search for good qualities in other people before jumping to conclusions.

Justice

The Jewish vision of justice includes a complete legal system, as well as the vision for a fair and just world.

Kindness

Hesed is pure kindness, offered unconditionally.

Knowledge of the Land of Israel

The Jewish people have ancient ties to the land of Israel. The more familiar we are with the land of our ancestors, the more connected to it we will be.

Leadership

Jewish leaders provide a vision based on Jewish values; they stand up for what is important, and anticipate the needs of the community. Everyone is a leader in some capacity.

Learning Torah

Learning Torah is an affirmation of our spiritual vitality and the means of cementing our bond with God. Insights gained through the continuous learning of Torah give meaning to life and provide communal uplift.

Love of the Land of Israel

The Jewish people have always felt a deep connection with and love for the Land of Israel.

Love of Zion

In every generation there has been a call for Jews to return to Zion. There has always been a deep connection between the People of Israel and the Land of Israel. The State of Israel represents an opportunity for Jews to express our national identity in all areas of life including the government, the army, and the court system.

Making Choices

To make good decisions, we must recognize and think through our choices.

Miracles and Wonders

Not all miracles are supernatural. There are also miracles in the regular course of nature and in our everyday lives. Our lives are enriched when we look at the world around us with a sense of awe and intense curiosity. Miracles demonstrate the greatness of God in this world.

Mutual Responsibility

Arevut inspires response-ability: learning to be aware of, sensitive to, and responsive to the needs of the Jewish community.

New Beginnings

New beginnings can produce positive growth on many levels: individual, group, and national.

Peace

Shalom means completeness and wholeness not only in our relationships with family and friends, but also with God.

Perseverance

Perseverance is anchored in hope and having a purpose (vision) in life.

Personal Satisfaction

True happiness emerges when we can appreciate what we have and look back at our accomplishments with satisfaction.

Prayer

Prayer increases awareness of God in our lives and expresses our hopes, wishes, needs, and thanks.

Protecting the Environment

God not only gave humans dominion over the environment, but also commanded us to protect and care for it.

Redemption

Redemption is an ongoing process in Jewish history that includes physical redemptions of the Jewish people as well as psychological redemption from attitudes that enslave us.

Remembrance

Memory is about what we consider important to pass on. Remembering something means keeping it constantly in our consciousness and learning from events of the past.

Respect for Animals

We show sensitivity to animals in the way that we treat them, not in the way that we feel about them. Human beings have permission to use animals for our benefit, not to exploit them.

Returning

Teshuvah is returning to one's better self and fulfilling the mission that God intended for each of us. We have the power to choose the right path, but this choice can often be difficult.

Righteous Giving

No act of tzedakah is too small to make a difference. Jews have an obligation to give a percentage of their possessions and money to the needy. When the community works together, the impact from tzedakah is greater.

Social Action

Jews are obligated to work toward creating a more just and righteous society.

Taking Initiative

We should look for occasions to contribute to society and be alert for those opportunities. However, there is a difference between passion and over-zealousness.

The Power of Rescue

Jews must get involved in helping people who are in trouble. Standing idly by is not an option.

The Power of Speech

Concentration and focused action ensure that language is used in a positive way.

Truth

Truth is the foundation of all social relationships.

Unity

The Jewish people are united by a common land, language, heritage, fate, and culture. It is important that we put aside our differences for our common goals.